So, if you’re not familiar with BPA (bisphenol-A) by now, I’ll give you the condensed version…it’s a chemical. It’s found in lots of things like can linings, baby bottles, pacifiers, food containers, receipts, dental sealants and more and it does lots of bad things to your body—BPA has been linked to breast and prostate cancer as well as obesity, early puberty, cardiac disease and lowered sperm counts, even at the low levels. Research indicates it’s best to be avoided, as evidenced by most of the civilized world banning it from baby bottles.

Canada took it a step further and declared it a toxic substance. Yay Canada! Here in America, however, we have a huge chemical lobby that has convinced our government representatives (yes, the ones who are supposed to be representing citizens, not chemical companies) to not ban BPA from baby bottles or anything else.

So, what are we supposed to do?

Well, we can buy things that are BPA-free. In some cases, however, it’s not that simple as there aren’t many BPA-free options. This is the case with canned foods. BPA is found in the linings of all canned goods, with just a few exceptions.

A recent peer-reviewed study indicated can linings and food packaging are a major source of BPA exposure and that by eating fresh uncanned foods, choosing glass and stainless steel food and beverage containers, and not microwaving in plastic we can decrease our exposure to BPA by as much as SIXTY PERCENT—just by making better choices.

If you want to do something about BPA, you can ask foodmakers if they’ll phase out BPA by going here. It’s super easy and will only take a minute. In America, we often have to vote with our dollars—if foodmakers see how many consumers actually care about BPA, they’ll be more likely to stop using it.


Download a wallet card of this graphic here

More information about BPA:

Healthy Child, Healthy World

Environmental Working Group – More Scientists Weigh in on BPA Dangers

Breast Cancer FundHow to reduce BPA Levels  by 60% in Three Day

 

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